Summer Skin Problems and Tips

Posted by Susan Brown on June 18, 2019 0 Comments

 

 

1. Acne breakouts: When sweat mixes with bacteria and oils on your skin, it can clog your pores. If you have acne-prone skin, this often means breakouts.

Dermatologists recommend the following to help prevent acne:

  • Blot sweat from your skin with a clean towel or cloth. Wiping sweat off can irritate your skin, which can lead to a breakout.
  • Wash sweaty clothes, headbands, towels, and hats before wearing them again.
  • Use non-comedogenic products on your face, neck, back, and chest. The label may also say “oil free” or “won’t clog pores.”

You’ll find more ways to prevent breakouts at: Acne

summer skin swim

2. Dry, irritated skin: When outdoor air is hot and humid, you can still have dry irritated skin. The biggest culprits are spending time in the sun, pool, and air-conditioning. 

If your skin starts to feel dry and irritated despite the humidity, try these tips:

  • Shower and shampoo immediately after getting out of the pool, using fresh, clean water and a mild cleanser or body wash made for swimmers.
  • Apply sunscreen before going outdoors, using one that offers broad-spectrum protection, SPF 30+, and water resistance.
  • Use a mild cleanser to wash your skin. Soaps and body washes labeled “antibacterial” or “deodorant” can dry your skin.
  • Take showers and baths in warm rather than hot water.
  • Slather on a fragrance-free moisturizer after every shower and bath. Moisturizer works by trapping water in your skin, so you’ll need to apply it within 5 minutes of taking a shower or bath.
  • Carry moisturizer with you, so you can apply it after washing your hands and when your skin feels dry.
  • Turn up the thermostat if the air conditioning makes your home too dry.
  • Apply Susan Brown's Baby Nourishing Lotion or Botanical Gelée. These will help to soothe and hydrate the skin. 


summer skin bike

3. Folliculitis: Every hair on your body grows out of an opening called a follicle. When follicles get infected, you develop folliculitis. Infected hair follicles look like pimples, but they tend to be itchy and tender.

To reduce your risk of getting folliculitis this summer:

  • Immediately after your workout, change out of tight workout clothes like biking shorts and shower.
  • Stay out of hot tubs and whirlpools if you’re unsure whether the acid and chlorine levels are properly controlled.So many people get folliculitis from a hot tub that there is actually a condition called “hot tub folliculitis.” 
  • Wear light-weight, loose-fitting clothes when it’s hot and humid.


4. Infection from a manicure or pedicure:
 Manicures and pedicures can leave your nails looking great, but they can also expose you to germs that can cause an infection.

You don’t have to give up manicures and pedicures. Taking some precautions can help you avoid an infection. 

You’ll find out what dermatologists recommend at: Manicure and pedicure safety 

5. Melasma:
 Being out in the sun can make those brown to gray-brown patches on your face more noticeable. 

There are things you can do to make it less noticeable even during the summer: Melasma

6. Poison ivy, oak, and sumac (rash):
 Many people develop an intensely itchy rash when a substance found in these plants, urushiol, gets on their skin. 

The best way to avoid this itchy rash is to learn what these plants look like and avoid them. You’ll find out how to identify these plants and protect your skin when you cannot avoid them at: Poison ivy, oak, and sumac

7. Prickly heat (or heat rash): Blocked sweat glands cause this. Because the sweat cannot get out, it builds up under your skin, causing a rash and tiny, itchy bumps. When the bumps burst and release sweat, many people feel a prickly sensation on their skin. 

Anything you can do to stop sweating profusely will help reduce your risk. Tips that dermatologists offer to their patients to help them sweat less and thereby lessen their risk of getting prickly heat include:

  • Wear light-weight, loose-fitting clothes made of cotton.
  • Exercise outdoors during the coolest parts of the day or move your workout indoors where you can be in air-conditioning.
  • Try to keep your skin cool by using fans, cool showers, and air-conditioning when possible.
  • If you do get a rash try applying Susan Brown's Baby Diaper Therapy Cream. This will help to soothe and heal the area. 


8. Seabather’s eruption:
 Also called pica-pica, this itchy rash develops in people who go in the Caribbean Sea and the waters off the coasts of Florida and Long Island, New York. You get it when newly hatched jellyfish or sea anemones get trapped between your skin and your swimsuit, fins, or other gear. 

The larvae are as small as a speck of pepper, so you won’t see them in the water. You can, however, prevent this rash if you:

  • Stay out of infested water. When the water is infested, you may see a sign that tells you to stay out of the water, or you may hear about someone who recently developed an itchy rash after being in the water.
  • If you do get a rash try applying Susan Brown's Baby Diaper Therapy Cream. This will help to soothe and heal the area. 


9. Sun allergy:
 You can develop hives (an allergic skin reaction) when you’re in the sun if you:

  • Take certain medications
  • Have a sun sensitivity (usually runs in the family)

If you have an allergic reaction to the sun, you’ll see red, scaly, and extremely itchy bumps on some (or all) bare skin. Some people also get blisters.

To prevent an allergic skin reaction:

  • Check your medication container (or ask your pharmacist) to find out if it can cause an allergic reaction when you go out in the sun. Medications that can cause an allergic sun reaction include ketoprofen (found in some pain meds) and these antibiotics — tetracycline, doxycycline, and minocycline. If the medicine can cause a reaction, stay out of the sun.
  • Protect your skin from the sun. You can do this by seeking shade, wearing sun-protective clothes, and applying sunscreen that offers broad-spectrum protection, water resistance, and an SPF of 30 or more.
  • Apply Susan Brown's Baby Nourishing Lotion or Botanical Gelée. These will help to calm the skin down.


10. Sunburn: Getting sunburn can spoil summer fun and increase your risk of developing skin cancer. Here’s what you can do to prevent sunburned skin:

  • Seek shade.
  • Wear a wide-brimmed hat, sunglasses, long sleeves, and pants when possible.
  • Apply sunscreen that offers broad-spectrum protection, SPF 30+, and water resistance.
  • Apply Susan Brown's Baby Nourishing Lotion or Botanical Gelée. These will help to soothe the burn.

11. Swimmer’s ear: When water gets trapped in your ear canal, you can develop an infection called swimmer’s ear. 

You can prevent this infection by keeping your ears dry. Here’s what dermatologists recommend:

  • Wear ear plugs while swimming.
  • Never clean your ears with cotton swabs because these can push earwax and dirt deeper into your ear canal and irritate your ear.


12. Swimmer’s itch: 
Also called clam digger’s itch, this itchy rash appears after wading or swimming in lakes, oceans, and other bodies of water. You get it when parasites in the water burrow into your skin, causing tiny red spots on areas that your swimsuit didn’t cover. Sometimes, intensely itch welts (hives) and blisters appear. 

Children are especially susceptible because they tend to stay in shallow, warmer water. 

You can prevent swimmer’s itch by taking the following precautions:

  • Stay out of infested water. When the water is infested, you may see a sign that tells you to stay out of the water, or you may hear about someone who recently developed an itchy rash after being in the water. 

  • Briskly rub your skin (and your child’s skin) with a towel after getting out of the water. The parasites start to burrow when the water on your skin begins evaporating not while you’re in the water.
  • Try applying Susan Brown's Baby Diaper Therapy Cream. This will help calm the skin and ease any redness.

Caution: If your skin stings with brisk rubbing, stop. You (or your child) may have seabather’s eruption.

When to call a dermatologist

While these summer skin problems can dampen your fun, they’re usually not serious. Most go away in a few days to a few weeks. If a rash or other skin problem lingers or worsens, you should call your dermatologist’s office.

For more tips on Summer skin care for baby and mom click here.

Information from:

https://www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/skin-care/summer-skin-problems

 

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How Baby Carriers Can Reduce Crying In Babies

Posted by Susan Brown on July 20, 2018 0 Comments

Thirteen percent of mothers admit that they find it difficult soothing their crying baby, according to a study carried out by Mohebati. If you’re one of these moms, you’ll be pleased to know that baby carriers are making a comeback. Business Wire reports that the global baby carrier market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 4.49% over the next four years. What’s even better is that placing your baby in a carrier gives you the opportunity to care for your skin after pregnancy without hindering the bond between you and your baby.

 

 Constant comfort

  One pediatrician-led Montreal study found that over the course of a six week period the babies of parents who carried their babies in a carrier for at least three hours a day and were encouraged to use the carrier cried 43% less than babies who were infrequently carried. While many babies cry because they want something, such as food or a clean nappy, there are times when they’ll get upset due to feeling insecure. Having spent nine months nestled in your womb, listening to your heartbeat, the sound of your voice and getting used to your smell, to suddenly be left alone in a Moses basket can be daunting. However, the comfort of a sling ensures these sounds and smells are available to your baby at all times and will ensure he or she is content.

 Learning rather than crying

  When a baby cries their full attention is on being comforted. But, when a baby is happy, they’re learning. Researchers have found that babies who are carried have increased visual and auditory alertness, due to them being content and in a calm atmosphere, known as ‘quiet alertness’. When a baby is in this state they are taking in everything that’s going on in the world around them and are learning all the time. Your Amazing Newborn explains that during the ‘quiet alert’ state babies "can follow a red ball, gaze at a face, turn to a voice.” Therefore, when you’re looking for ways to comfort your baby and boost his or her development, opt for a high-quality sling which keeps them close at all times.

Fights boredom

Babies can get bored, according to child psychologist Penelope Leach who states that parents who fail to interact with their newborn may have a restless baby on their hands. Bath time is a great way to combat boredom as your child will love the feel of the bubbly water and a massage with some nourishing baby lotion afterward will provide a sense of calm. However, it may not be long before boredom sets in. Placing your newborn in a carrier during this time should provide amusement as your little one will have countless things to see and do which will trigger his or her interest as you go about your day to day skincare routine and clean the house. It might seem dull to you, but watching your facial movements as you clean the dishes or hang out the washing will keep your child entertained for hours and there’ll be no tears to contend with.

There is strong evidence to support the theory that carried babies cry significantly less than non-carried babies. No mom wants to see or hear their little one crying for hours on end, so be sure to cradle your newborn to prevent boredom from setting in, for comfort and to enhance his or her development.

 

 

 

 

 

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Summer Skin Care For Mom And Baby

Posted by Susan Brown on April 25, 2018 0 Comments

With summer just around the corner, you’re probably wondering how best to protect you and your baby’s skin during the scorching months. Shockingly, just 29.9% of women regularly protect their skin from UV rays by using sunscreen on a regular basis, according to a research conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The skin is your body's largest organ and it deserves to be treated with care to prevent dryness and redness from the harmful rays of the sun. Here's how you can take care of you and your little one's skin this summer. 

Stay out of the sun

On hot, sunny days, it’s vital you do all you can to keep your baby out of the sun. That’s not to say you can’t enjoy the lovely weather, though. When outdoors, stay in cool, shady areas whenever possible and dress your youngster in loose, lightweight clothing. Remember to use a sunshade in the garden and on the side of your stroller. The US Food and Drug Administration and The Skin Cancer Foundation advise against putting sunscreen on babies under the age of six months. However, moms should always liberally apply sunscreen before heading out into the sun. If you are taking a medication you should check with your doctor to see if it makes you more sensitive to the sun. 

Eat and drink well

When it’s hot, it’s easy to become dehydrated. Therefore, it’s essential to eat foods to keep your skin healthy and nourished. Some foods, such as those high in sugar and salt, can be dehydrating and make the skin appear lackluster, so you'll want to avoid these whenever possible. Ensure you drink plenty of water to keep your skin looking and feeling its best, too. A young baby won’t necessarily be able to communicate with you that they’re thirsty, so, you need to keep a close eye on them and ensure that breast milk or formula is readily available. As per the American Academy of Pediatrics, babies under six months of age should not be given supplements, including water, unless instructed by a physician.

Enjoy a bath

 At the end of a joyous day in the sunshine, be sure to take some time to care for your skin. Before you and your bundle of joy head to bed, both of you should have a bath and use a gentle shampoo and body wash to wash off any sunscreen, dirt, and sweat accumulated in the hair and on the body over the course of the day. Remember to apply a natural and soothing body lotion to both of your bodies too to restore moisture and to leave your skin feeling great.

Summer is a time for both mom and baby to get out and about and enjoy the good weather. To keep you and your baby’s skin protected and looking healthy, make sure you stay out of the sun as much as possible, eat well and stay hydrated, and enjoy a soak in the bath to restore you as you prepare to spend the rest of the summer with your little one.

 

 

 

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Caring for Your Child’s Multi-Ethnic Hair

Posted by Susan Brown on April 10, 2018 0 Comments

If your little toddler or child ever asks you why styling their curls is so much work, the answer should always be, “because multi-ethnic hair is beautiful!” Curls do take a little more work, but that bounce and volume is all worth it. The key to stylish locks for babies and children with curly hair is to keep it simple, use gentle products, embrace a chemical-free lifestyle, and moisturize, moisturize, moisturize.

 Shampooing Less Frequently

Dryness is the main reason why curls might bunch up and tangle, and one reason it can exist is because of frequent washing. Some moms of multi-ethnic babes swear that shampooing once a week is more than enough, with conditioner or even spraying warm water onto hair being more than enough on other days.

 Not all babies, toddlers or little kids are alike; older children may really be into sport and may sweat considerably, thus necessitating a good shampoo more than once a week. If so, use gentle products such as Susan Brown’s Baby’s Foaming Shampoo & Wash, which is free of phthalates, sodium laurel sulfate, and  parabens, and is tear-free and ph-balanced. It is surprising to note that many commercial brands still contain harmful ingredients such as sulfates, which have been linked to everything from skin irritation to cancer.

 Adding Moisture to Your Routine

When bathing your child or helping them shower, apply shampoo or conditioner gently onto wet hair, massaging into the scalp and ever-so-gently tugging at knotted areas to smooth out. Always start at the end of the hair, working your way up slowly towards the scalp. Rub the hair gently between your thumb, pointer and middle finger, to loosen up any tangles you find. This process is vital because afterwards, it will be much easier to comb hair.

 Add a few drops of oil (argan, coconut or jojoba are deeply moisturizing) and massage on to your child’s locks as well. This will lend hair a beautiful shine and will lead to more defined curls.

 Combing Hair Out

An important strategy for styling multi-ethnic hair is to use as wide-toothed a comb as possible, to ensure less tangling; the comb cannot be too wide, however, since children tend to have less volume than adults.

You will find that with the added moisture, combing will be a breeze. You can add a touch of detangling spray if necessary, or a tiny bit more natural oil for extra shine.

In the summer, let hair air dry and in the winter, consider performing this routine at night, or gently dry with a hair diffuser, which distributes heat evenly through the head. When hair is almost dry, ask your child to bend forward. Move the diffuser in a down-to-up motion, to shape curls and add a bit of bounce.

Once you comb out your child’s hair, you can also skip the drying and ponytail hair back or style into a plait; styling when hair is wet is the easiest way to do so, since there will be zero tangles at this stage

Styling multi-ethnic hair is easy whenever moisture takes center stage. As your child grows up, feel free to experiment with multi-ethnicity brands that have a wealth of products aimed at particular types of hair (e.g. kinky hair will need more moisture, while wavy hair will benefit from curl defining products). With a little practice and plenty of variety in the styles you choose, your children will undoubtedly love their curls and the many styles they can sport.

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Bathing Tips for Your New Baby

Posted by Susan Brown on March 19, 2018 0 Comments

Now that you are home from the hospital and starting your 4th Trimester...

You may have questions on how to bathe your little one. See our tips below:

How often to bathe your baby

In many families, a bath becomes the focus of a nightly bedtime routine. But from a cleanliness perspective, until your baby is crawling around and getting into messes, a bath isn't really necessary more than a few times a week. Just wash his face frequently, clean anywhere there are skin folds, and thoroughly clean his genital area after each diaper change.

Where to bathe your baby

It makes sense to use the kitchen sink or a small plastic baby tub. A standard bathtub requires you to kneel or lean awkwardly over your baby and gives you less control over his movements.

How to give your baby a bath

Here's how to do it and what you'll need to make baby-bathing easy. With any luck, bath time will become one of the most enjoyable parts of your days together:

1. Gather all necessary bath supplies, and lay out a towel, a clean diaper, and clothes. Make sure the room is comfortably warm so your baby doesn't get chilled.

2. Fill the tub with about 3 inches of water that feels warm but not hot to the inside of your wrist – about 90 degrees Fahrenheit (32 degrees Celsius) or a few degrees warmer.

3. Bring your baby to the bath area and undress her completely.

4. Gradually slip your baby into the tub feet first, using one hand to support her neck and head. Pour cupfuls of bath water over her regularly during the bath so she doesn't get cold.

5. Use mild soap sparingly (too much dries out your baby's skin). Wash her with your hand or a washcloth from top to bottom, front and back. Start by washing her scalp with a wet, soapy cloth. Rinse the soap from the cloth and use it to gently clean her eyes and face. If dried mucus has collected in the corner of your baby's nostrils or eyes, dab it several times with a small section of a moistened washcloth to soften it before you wipe it out. As for your baby's genitals, a routine washing is all that's needed.

6. Rinse your baby thoroughly with cupfuls of clean water, and wipe her with a clean washcloth.

7. Wrap your baby in a hooded towel and pat her dry. If her skin is dry, or if she has a bit of diaper rash, you may want to apply a mild lotion after her bath.

 

Source: Pregnancy Center

 

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