Look Good And Get Your Glow Back: Easy Skincare And Haircare Tips After Pregnancy

Posted by Susan Brown on February 02, 2018 0 Comments

Pregnancy and giving birth can change a woman in so many ways. Not only do you experience the joy of being a mother, but you also get to have instant camaraderie with other women who’ve had the same experience. If you’ve ever talked to another mom who just gave birth, one topic of conversation that is sure to come up is how one’s body and skin changes after giving birth. You may have experienced having that great pregnancy glow the whole nine months while carrying your baby, but after giving birth, you find yourself dealing with certain skin problems. And of course, there’s the loose skin around your belly to deal with, stretch marks on your tummy, and the fact that you seem to be shedding more hair than usual. Don’t fret—all of these are normal post-pregnancy conditions, and there are several ways to deal with these problems without spending a fortune. Look good and get your glow back by following these easy skincare and haircare tips after pregnancy.

 

 

For postpartum acne

 

 

It’s not uncommon for new moms to deal with postpartum acne as giving birth can trigger acne eruptions. To deal with acne, consider going natural first as taking antibiotics or other medication for acne may be harmful to your baby’s health if you’re breastfeeding. Eat a balanced diet and increase your consumption of anti-acne and skin-friendly foods such as whole grains, dark and leafy vegetables, fatty fish, fruits, and foods rich in Vitamins A and E. To get rid of blackheads, use a blackhead extraction tool such as a suction remover or a loop extractor to decongest your pores. Go easy on your acne, avoid excessive exfoliation, and ask your dermatologist to recommend a spot treatment gel that’s safe to use while breastfeeding.

 

 

For loose skin and stretch marks

 

 

It’s normal to still have loose skin and belly flab weeks after having your baby. To make your belly firmer, you’ll need to lose weight slowly as losing weight at a fast rate may result to even more loose skin on your tummy. Pay attention to food portions and do some aerobic exercises at least three times a week. To target flab, do planks and strength-training exercises. In time, your tummy will get firmer and the loose skin will be less noticeable. For stretch marks, apply a stretch mark therapy cream liberally, making sure to massage the cream into the skin. Do this daily after a shower or a bath to lock in moisture and to make stretch marks fade away.

 

 

For falling hair

 

 

Treat your hair gently if you’re experiencing excessive hair fall. Don’t wear your hair in a tight ponytail or bun as this can aggravate hair fall. Use a volumizing shampoo and wait a few months before coloring, straightening, or perming your hair. Apply a lightweight conditioner only to the ends of your hair to avoid weighing your hair down. You may also want to try a shorter hairstyle as it can make your hair appear fuller than it is.

 

 

Restore your glow by following these tips to look great after giving birth. Remember to treat your skin and hair gently and to consult your doctor before using new products to make sure that it’s safe for you and your baby.

 

 

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Can medications make you more sensitive to the sun?

Posted by Susan Brown on August 29, 2017 0 Comments

This summer's must-reads aren't romances or thrillers; they're the warning labels and package inserts for your drugs and supplements. As Consumer Reports on Health warned in a recent article, “[s]ome widely used medications can make you far more sensitive to summer’s sunlight and heat than you’d usually be.”

That sensitivity can mean anything from a reduced ability to sweat to an increase in the amount of fluid you lose through your urine. So it’s important to revisit whatever safety info you have, and to check in with your doctor, who can let you know about potential risks during the brightest, warmest time of year.

Here are some of the better-known substances that may allow summer's sun and heat to hit you harder:

Antibiotics

 

“Antibiotics can cause photosensitivity and phototoxic reactions, meaning that they’re going to worsen your sunburn,” Rech says. “The one that comes to mind right away is Bactrim, or sulfamethoxozole trimethoprim.” Bactrim is prescribed to treat everything from bronchitis to bladder infections. “That’s a big offender, and so are tetracyclines and fluoroqinolones.” That said, you should never, ever skip an antibiotic for the sake of sunbathing, warns Rech. Your doctor can help you juggle your plans and your meds. 

Allergy medications

 

Some users find that oral antihistamines like diphenydramine (found in products like Benadryl and Dramamine) reduce their ability to sweat. In extreme cases, as the Consumer Reports medical advisory board noted, the overheating that can result leads to cramps, exhaustion, and even heat stroke. If you find that your allergy meds make it difficult for you to cool down, plan outdoor activities for the morning and evening, and try to spend the hottest hours of the day indoors.

Antidepressants

 

Tricyclic antidepressants may cause problems in hot weather because they "prevent the area in your brain that regulates heat response from knowing you’re overheating,” Rech explains. “They can also decrease sweating, which leads to a decrease in heat loss.”

When you’re taking a drug that increases the likelihood of overheating, stay alert for warning signssuch as headaches, lightheadedness, nausea, and weakness. If you experience any of those symptoms, get out of the sun and reach for water or a sports drink with sodium (which will help your body retain fluid until balance is restored). In the event of a severe reaction such as confusion, fever, or fainting, contact your doctor or call 911.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)

 

“The main non-steroidals that cause phototoxicity are probably not ones that we commonly use," Rech says. But still, caution should be used, especially if you're on other medications. "Any time you’re taking a non-steroidal and going out in the sun I would recommend barrier protection with sunscreen and avoidance if possible, because any of the non-steroidals can worsen [phototoxicity],” Rech explains.

Vitamins and herbs

 

“A lot of over-the-counter herbal medications [can have phototoxic effects]—for example, St. John’s Wort is a big inducer of photosensitivity, and that medication in particular has a number of drug interactions. Anyone [interested in taking it] should ask their doctor or pharmacist first,” says Rech. Another pill that might put you at risk: Niacin, a form of Vitamin B3 that’s used to treat high cholesterol. It can cause skin reactions, Rech says, "so it could potentially cause [sun sensitivity].”


Topical medications

 

Significant sun exposure can amplify the effect of transdermal patches (such as Fentanyl, a powerful pain reliever, or Clonidine, which lowers blood pressure) that deliver medication directly through the skin. When you get a sunburn, the blood vessels in the surface of your skin dilate, explains Rech, and that can lead to increased absorption of your meds. So if you’re wearing a patch, it's a good idea to consider long sleeves.

Source: http://www.health.com/family/heat-sun-sensitivity-medication

 

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Should I use natural cleaning products while pregnant?

Posted by Susan Brown on August 23, 2017 0 Comments

There are some household cleansers that pregnant women should avoid. Check the labels and avoid products that say they're toxic, since they may contain risky solvents. For example, oven cleaners and window cleaners often contain glycol ethers, which have been known to increase a woman's risk of miscarriage, and most mildew removers contain phenols, which may increase risk of birth defects or fetal death. Plus, most cleansers contain strong-smelling chemicals like ammonia or chlorine, which won't hurt your baby but may make you queasy.

Whether you’re trying to minimize your carbon footprint or are concerned about the effect harsh chemicals may have on your family’s health, switching to natural bathroom cleansers is a great choice. Although there are tons of “green” bathroom products available in stores, in most cases it’s cheaper and more effective to make them on your own. And, chances are, your kitchen cupboard is already stocked with many of the ingredients. From cleansers made with grapefruits and lemons to vinegar and baking soda, here are some of our favorite natural and homemade bathroom cleansers. Check out this link for more information how to clean your house naturally...

http://www.modernbathroom.com/blog/post/2015/10/27/how-to-clean-your-bathroom-naturally

 

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