How Baby Carriers Can Reduce Crying In Babies

Posted by Susan Brown on July 20, 2018 0 Comments

Thirteen percent of mothers admit that they find it difficult soothing their crying baby, according to a study carried out by Mohebati. If you’re one of these moms, you’ll be pleased to know that baby carriers are making a comeback. Business Wire reports that the global baby carrier market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 4.49% over the next four years. What’s even better is that placing your baby in a carrier gives you the opportunity to care for your skin after pregnancy without hindering the bond between you and your baby.

 

 Constant comfort

  One pediatrician-led Montreal study found that over the course of a six week period the babies of parents who carried their babies in a carrier for at least three hours a day and were encouraged to use the carrier cried 43% less than babies who were infrequently carried. While many babies cry because they want something, such as food or a clean nappy, there are times when they’ll get upset due to feeling insecure. Having spent nine months nestled in your womb, listening to your heartbeat, the sound of your voice and getting used to your smell, to suddenly be left alone in a Moses basket can be daunting. However, the comfort of a sling ensures these sounds and smells are available to your baby at all times and will ensure he or she is content.

 Learning rather than crying

  When a baby cries their full attention is on being comforted. But, when a baby is happy, they’re learning. Researchers have found that babies who are carried have increased visual and auditory alertness, due to them being content and in a calm atmosphere, known as ‘quiet alertness’. When a baby is in this state they are taking in everything that’s going on in the world around them and are learning all the time. Your Amazing Newborn explains that during the ‘quiet alert’ state babies "can follow a red ball, gaze at a face, turn to a voice.” Therefore, when you’re looking for ways to comfort your baby and boost his or her development, opt for a high-quality sling which keeps them close at all times.

Fights boredom

Babies can get bored, according to child psychologist Penelope Leach who states that parents who fail to interact with their newborn may have a restless baby on their hands. Bath time is a great way to combat boredom as your child will love the feel of the bubbly water and a massage with some nourishing baby lotion afterward will provide a sense of calm. However, it may not be long before boredom sets in. Placing your newborn in a carrier during this time should provide amusement as your little one will have countless things to see and do which will trigger his or her interest as you go about your day to day skincare routine and clean the house. It might seem dull to you, but watching your facial movements as you clean the dishes or hang out the washing will keep your child entertained for hours and there’ll be no tears to contend with.

There is strong evidence to support the theory that carried babies cry significantly less than non-carried babies. No mom wants to see or hear their little one crying for hours on end, so be sure to cradle your newborn to prevent boredom from setting in, for comfort and to enhance his or her development.

 

 

 

 

 

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Look Good And Get Your Glow Back: Easy Skincare And Haircare Tips After Pregnancy

Posted by Susan Brown on February 02, 2018 0 Comments

Pregnancy and giving birth can change a woman in so many ways. Not only do you experience the joy of being a mother, but you also get to have instant camaraderie with other women who’ve had the same experience. If you’ve ever talked to another mom who just gave birth, one topic of conversation that is sure to come up is how one’s body and skin changes after giving birth. You may have experienced having that great pregnancy glow the whole nine months while carrying your baby, but after giving birth, you find yourself dealing with certain skin problems. And of course, there’s the loose skin around your belly to deal with, stretch marks on your tummy, and the fact that you seem to be shedding more hair than usual. Don’t fret—all of these are normal post-pregnancy conditions, and there are several ways to deal with these problems without spending a fortune. Look good and get your glow back by following these easy skincare and haircare tips after pregnancy.

 

 

For postpartum acne

 

 

It’s not uncommon for new moms to deal with postpartum acne as giving birth can trigger acne eruptions. To deal with acne, consider going natural first as taking antibiotics or other medication for acne may be harmful to your baby’s health if you’re breastfeeding. Eat a balanced diet and increase your consumption of anti-acne and skin-friendly foods such as whole grains, dark and leafy vegetables, fatty fish, fruits, and foods rich in Vitamins A and E. To get rid of blackheads, use a blackhead extraction tool such as a suction remover or a loop extractor to decongest your pores. Go easy on your acne, avoid excessive exfoliation, and ask your dermatologist to recommend a spot treatment gel that’s safe to use while breastfeeding.

 

 

For loose skin and stretch marks

 

 

It’s normal to still have loose skin and belly flab weeks after having your baby. To make your belly firmer, you’ll need to lose weight slowly as losing weight at a fast rate may result to even more loose skin on your tummy. Pay attention to food portions and do some aerobic exercises at least three times a week. To target flab, do planks and strength-training exercises. In time, your tummy will get firmer and the loose skin will be less noticeable. For stretch marks, apply a stretch mark therapy cream liberally, making sure to massage the cream into the skin. Do this daily after a shower or a bath to lock in moisture and to make stretch marks fade away.

 

 

For falling hair

 

 

Treat your hair gently if you’re experiencing excessive hair fall. Don’t wear your hair in a tight ponytail or bun as this can aggravate hair fall. Use a volumizing shampoo and wait a few months before coloring, straightening, or perming your hair. Apply a lightweight conditioner only to the ends of your hair to avoid weighing your hair down. You may also want to try a shorter hairstyle as it can make your hair appear fuller than it is.

 

 

Restore your glow by following these tips to look great after giving birth. Remember to treat your skin and hair gently and to consult your doctor before using new products to make sure that it’s safe for you and your baby.

 

 

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Considerations of Renting Property As New Parents 

Posted by Susan Brown on January 18, 2018 0 Comments

 

Everything is slightly harder after baby arrives, from sleeping, to eating, to baby proofing a home that might not be yours. The first year of a baby’s life moves fast, with baby going from staying still to becoming quite mobile. Additionally, as baby ages, he or she will eventually need personal sleeping space away from Mom and Dad. Renting a home and trying to cater to baby’s growing needs are often a challenge, unless the stages are considered one at a time.

0-3 Months

Renting at this age is the easiest in regards to the baby, but the toughest in regards to the lease. This is the time when the parents are the most tired, and things around the home are left undone. However, sleepy parents who ignore household maintenance may be breaking lease rules. For example, if the yard maintenance must be done by the tenants, the landlord might get upset when the lawn is left unmowed for three months. Everything, from paying rent on time to cleaning the kitchen counters might take a break when baby is brand new. Communicating with the landlord is the first line of defense against offending the lease. While many landlords purchase insurance against missed rent payments, missing payments will still affect your credit score. Avoid a situation by talking to the landlord. Inform him or her that a baby is coming, and discuss the possibility of flexible lease terms. There may be a paid service for lawn care, or a clause that covers hardship situations.

3-6 Months

Baby won’t be moving extensively yet, but scooting will begin during this baby stage of development. Some babies might even crawl at this point. Again, reviewing the lease to find out about wall hangings is important at this stage. Many baby items, such as baby gates, attach to walls. Many rentals, however, do not allow any holes larger than a nail hole in the walls. This means that a different baby gate will need to be used, such as a gate that depends on pressure against a wall to remain in place. Additionally, wall mounts to hold televisions will need to be kept out of the walls, and drawer locks that drill into the cabinets will not work out. Luckily, there are a variety of different baby safety options, such as television anchors that attach to the entertainment center instead of the wall. Look for safety options that do not cause damage to walls, ceilings, cabinets or floors.

6-9 Months

This is the age when little ones figure out how to become fully mobile. While they are not yet walking, they are crawling, possibly pulling themselves up, or even taking a few wobbly steps. Living in a rental during this time means making sure the corners are secure with removable corner covers. These soft covers will come off when the rental property is returned to the owner, but will help keep baby safe. Talk to the landlord about any cracks in the floors that could be fixed to help keep baby safe as he or she explores. Choose a high chair that does not attach to the counters to avoid causing damage, and keep a wet/dry mop handy to clean up after baby, who is now eating some solids and making dinner messes on the floor.

9-12 Months

This is definitely go time! The baby is possibly walking fully, exploring everything, and making messes everywhere. Disinfecting wipes are a parent’s best friend, as they will help keep areas clean. Many leases include a cleanliness clause, as cleanliness helps maintain the property. The wet/dry mop will also come in handy, as will a mobile crib where baby can play while Mom or Dad clean up a room. Make sure to double check safety locks, and replace any that have been damaged. When replacing safety equipment, look over the cabinet or wall where it is attached. Make sure the equipment is not damaging the rental property.

Sleeping Arrangements

The baby may stay with Mom and Dad in a crib at first, but will eventually need to move to another bedroom. When renting a home, it’s important to review the lease agreement. According to the Fair Housing Act, landlords cannot tell parents where the baby sleeps, or with whom the baby shares a room. However, some leases state that the parents must report the additional person in the home. This clause is often included to keep people from moving in too many adults. It is legal for the landlord to know who is living in the home, but it is not legal for him or her to dictate sleeping arrangements. 

In the end, when parents are open with landlords, the latter tend to work with tenants. Tenants who pay rent consistently and abide by lease guidelines typically have few issues with landlords when baby arrives. Using open, honest communication, following the rules as much as possible, and working out a plan ahead of time is the best way to rent a home with an infant.

 

*Photo by Picsea on Unsplash

 

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