How Baby Carriers Can Reduce Crying In Babies

Posted by Susan Brown on July 20, 2018 0 Comments

Thirteen percent of mothers admit that they find it difficult soothing their crying baby, according to a study carried out by Mohebati. If you’re one of these moms, you’ll be pleased to know that baby carriers are making a comeback. Business Wire reports that the global baby carrier market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 4.49% over the next four years. What’s even better is that placing your baby in a carrier gives you the opportunity to care for your skin after pregnancy without hindering the bond between you and your baby.

 

 Constant comfort

  One pediatrician-led Montreal study found that over the course of a six week period the babies of parents who carried their babies in a carrier for at least three hours a day and were encouraged to use the carrier cried 43% less than babies who were infrequently carried. While many babies cry because they want something, such as food or a clean nappy, there are times when they’ll get upset due to feeling insecure. Having spent nine months nestled in your womb, listening to your heartbeat, the sound of your voice and getting used to your smell, to suddenly be left alone in a Moses basket can be daunting. However, the comfort of a sling ensures these sounds and smells are available to your baby at all times and will ensure he or she is content.

 Learning rather than crying

  When a baby cries their full attention is on being comforted. But, when a baby is happy, they’re learning. Researchers have found that babies who are carried have increased visual and auditory alertness, due to them being content and in a calm atmosphere, known as ‘quiet alertness’. When a baby is in this state they are taking in everything that’s going on in the world around them and are learning all the time. Your Amazing Newborn explains that during the ‘quiet alert’ state babies "can follow a red ball, gaze at a face, turn to a voice.” Therefore, when you’re looking for ways to comfort your baby and boost his or her development, opt for a high-quality sling which keeps them close at all times.

Fights boredom

Babies can get bored, according to child psychologist Penelope Leach who states that parents who fail to interact with their newborn may have a restless baby on their hands. Bath time is a great way to combat boredom as your child will love the feel of the bubbly water and a massage with some nourishing baby lotion afterward will provide a sense of calm. However, it may not be long before boredom sets in. Placing your newborn in a carrier during this time should provide amusement as your little one will have countless things to see and do which will trigger his or her interest as you go about your day to day skincare routine and clean the house. It might seem dull to you, but watching your facial movements as you clean the dishes or hang out the washing will keep your child entertained for hours and there’ll be no tears to contend with.

There is strong evidence to support the theory that carried babies cry significantly less than non-carried babies. No mom wants to see or hear their little one crying for hours on end, so be sure to cradle your newborn to prevent boredom from setting in, for comfort and to enhance his or her development.

 

 

 

 

 

Read More

Caring for Your Child’s Multi-Ethnic Hair

Posted by Susan Brown on April 10, 2018 0 Comments

If your little toddler or child ever asks you why styling their curls is so much work, the answer should always be, “because multi-ethnic hair is beautiful!” Curls do take a little more work, but that bounce and volume is all worth it. The key to stylish locks for babies and children with curly hair is to keep it simple, use gentle products, embrace a chemical-free lifestyle, and moisturize, moisturize, moisturize.

 Shampooing Less Frequently

Dryness is the main reason why curls might bunch up and tangle, and one reason it can exist is because of frequent washing. Some moms of multi-ethnic babes swear that shampooing once a week is more than enough, with conditioner or even spraying warm water onto hair being more than enough on other days.

 Not all babies, toddlers or little kids are alike; older children may really be into sport and may sweat considerably, thus necessitating a good shampoo more than once a week. If so, use gentle products such as Susan Brown’s Baby’s Foaming Shampoo & Wash, which is free of phthalates, sodium laurel sulfate, and  parabens, and is tear-free and ph-balanced. It is surprising to note that many commercial brands still contain harmful ingredients such as sulfates, which have been linked to everything from skin irritation to cancer.

 Adding Moisture to Your Routine

When bathing your child or helping them shower, apply shampoo or conditioner gently onto wet hair, massaging into the scalp and ever-so-gently tugging at knotted areas to smooth out. Always start at the end of the hair, working your way up slowly towards the scalp. Rub the hair gently between your thumb, pointer and middle finger, to loosen up any tangles you find. This process is vital because afterwards, it will be much easier to comb hair.

 Add a few drops of oil (argan, coconut or jojoba are deeply moisturizing) and massage on to your child’s locks as well. This will lend hair a beautiful shine and will lead to more defined curls.

 Combing Hair Out

An important strategy for styling multi-ethnic hair is to use as wide-toothed a comb as possible, to ensure less tangling; the comb cannot be too wide, however, since children tend to have less volume than adults.

You will find that with the added moisture, combing will be a breeze. You can add a touch of detangling spray if necessary, or a tiny bit more natural oil for extra shine.

In the summer, let hair air dry and in the winter, consider performing this routine at night, or gently dry with a hair diffuser, which distributes heat evenly through the head. When hair is almost dry, ask your child to bend forward. Move the diffuser in a down-to-up motion, to shape curls and add a bit of bounce.

Once you comb out your child’s hair, you can also skip the drying and ponytail hair back or style into a plait; styling when hair is wet is the easiest way to do so, since there will be zero tangles at this stage

Styling multi-ethnic hair is easy whenever moisture takes center stage. As your child grows up, feel free to experiment with multi-ethnicity brands that have a wealth of products aimed at particular types of hair (e.g. kinky hair will need more moisture, while wavy hair will benefit from curl defining products). With a little practice and plenty of variety in the styles you choose, your children will undoubtedly love their curls and the many styles they can sport.

Read More

Recent Blog Posts