Taking Care of Yourself in the 4th Trimester and Makeup Hacks for New Moms

Posted by Susan Brown on February 12, 2018 0 Comments

Since new moms go through so many different life changes after having a baby, it can be challenging to keep up with appearances—especially in terms of makeup. For new moms, putting on makeup every day when your little one is crying for breakfast or needing to be changed can easily become the last resort on your to-do list. But still, there are many simple hair care and other hygiene tips for new moms that can make personal care routines seem like less of a strain.

By taking just five minutes, new moms can develop a quick makeup routine that can be done without much effort each day. Wearing healthy, natural makeup can help you feel polished, refreshed and ready to take on the day. Implementing these simple makeup hacks to your daily routine will make you feel youthful and put-together; after all, moms deserve to be pampered, too. 

Make Your Skin Glow

Most new moms have probably experienced changes in their skin after having a baby. People always talk about the pregnancy glow, but what about the new-mom glow? Fortunately, by prepping your skin and taking care of it properly, both in the morning and at night, new moms can make their skin glow and look refreshed.

First, use a foundation to even out skin  as it will disguise any spots or blemishes. Using the foundation with a light moisturizer is important to keep the skin looking young and to make sure your overall complexion doesn’t suffer dryness throughout the day. Plus, it will help your skin glow and have an overall fresh look, even if you are tired from taking care of the baby.

Perk Up Your Tired Eyes

If you haven’t gotten much sleep lately, you may not know what types of makeup to use to perk up your tired eyes. However, using moisturizing eye drops in the morning will instantly brighten up your eyes—and it may even help to wake you up! By then adding a little under-eye concealer, you can reduce dark circles underneath the eyes.

It also helps to get your eyebrows shaped or waxed, as this will better define your eyes and make your face generally look more polished. If you have the time, you can sweep a brown powder along your upper lash line to further enhance the definition but still looks soft. And as always, a little mascara goes a long way in diminishing over-tiredness.

If you are a new mom looking for some makeup tips, try moisturizing or using foundation to make your skin glow and focus on brightening up your eyes as part of the easiest five-minute morning routine.

Check out our friends at 4thtrimesteraz.org who are hosting a 4th Trimester Conference on March 10th, 2018 in Mesa, AZ. See more info below.

The 4th Trimester Arizona connects a village of new families by providing resources, support and nurturing through conferences and community events.

The vulnerability of women and families during the postpartum period is often overlooked in the U.S. Women may feel pressure to clean, make dinner, lose baby weight, and possibly to return to work, all while healing from birth and learning how to care for a newborn’s every need, often in isolation. Many face sleepless nights, pain, hormonal changes, physical exhaustion, money concerns, and more. Because social mores dictate that women feel only joy and fulfillment during this time, many mothers feel shame and guilt at their own disappointment and feelings of overwhelm. Fathers, partners and other family members often feel helpless as well, as they may need to return to work full time, may themselves be sleep deprived, and may be without resources or tools to offer the mother.

 

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Considerations of Renting Property As New Parents 

Posted by Susan Brown on January 18, 2018 0 Comments

 

Everything is slightly harder after baby arrives, from sleeping, to eating, to baby proofing a home that might not be yours. The first year of a baby’s life moves fast, with baby going from staying still to becoming quite mobile. Additionally, as baby ages, he or she will eventually need personal sleeping space away from Mom and Dad. Renting a home and trying to cater to baby’s growing needs are often a challenge, unless the stages are considered one at a time.

0-3 Months

Renting at this age is the easiest in regards to the baby, but the toughest in regards to the lease. This is the time when the parents are the most tired, and things around the home are left undone. However, sleepy parents who ignore household maintenance may be breaking lease rules. For example, if the yard maintenance must be done by the tenants, the landlord might get upset when the lawn is left unmowed for three months. Everything, from paying rent on time to cleaning the kitchen counters might take a break when baby is brand new. Communicating with the landlord is the first line of defense against offending the lease. While many landlords purchase insurance against missed rent payments, missing payments will still affect your credit score. Avoid a situation by talking to the landlord. Inform him or her that a baby is coming, and discuss the possibility of flexible lease terms. There may be a paid service for lawn care, or a clause that covers hardship situations.

3-6 Months

Baby won’t be moving extensively yet, but scooting will begin during this baby stage of development. Some babies might even crawl at this point. Again, reviewing the lease to find out about wall hangings is important at this stage. Many baby items, such as baby gates, attach to walls. Many rentals, however, do not allow any holes larger than a nail hole in the walls. This means that a different baby gate will need to be used, such as a gate that depends on pressure against a wall to remain in place. Additionally, wall mounts to hold televisions will need to be kept out of the walls, and drawer locks that drill into the cabinets will not work out. Luckily, there are a variety of different baby safety options, such as television anchors that attach to the entertainment center instead of the wall. Look for safety options that do not cause damage to walls, ceilings, cabinets or floors.

6-9 Months

This is the age when little ones figure out how to become fully mobile. While they are not yet walking, they are crawling, possibly pulling themselves up, or even taking a few wobbly steps. Living in a rental during this time means making sure the corners are secure with removable corner covers. These soft covers will come off when the rental property is returned to the owner, but will help keep baby safe. Talk to the landlord about any cracks in the floors that could be fixed to help keep baby safe as he or she explores. Choose a high chair that does not attach to the counters to avoid causing damage, and keep a wet/dry mop handy to clean up after baby, who is now eating some solids and making dinner messes on the floor.

9-12 Months

This is definitely go time! The baby is possibly walking fully, exploring everything, and making messes everywhere. Disinfecting wipes are a parent’s best friend, as they will help keep areas clean. Many leases include a cleanliness clause, as cleanliness helps maintain the property. The wet/dry mop will also come in handy, as will a mobile crib where baby can play while Mom or Dad clean up a room. Make sure to double check safety locks, and replace any that have been damaged. When replacing safety equipment, look over the cabinet or wall where it is attached. Make sure the equipment is not damaging the rental property.

Sleeping Arrangements

The baby may stay with Mom and Dad in a crib at first, but will eventually need to move to another bedroom. When renting a home, it’s important to review the lease agreement. According to the Fair Housing Act, landlords cannot tell parents where the baby sleeps, or with whom the baby shares a room. However, some leases state that the parents must report the additional person in the home. This clause is often included to keep people from moving in too many adults. It is legal for the landlord to know who is living in the home, but it is not legal for him or her to dictate sleeping arrangements. 

In the end, when parents are open with landlords, the latter tend to work with tenants. Tenants who pay rent consistently and abide by lease guidelines typically have few issues with landlords when baby arrives. Using open, honest communication, following the rules as much as possible, and working out a plan ahead of time is the best way to rent a home with an infant.

 

*Photo by Picsea on Unsplash

 

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Can medications make you more sensitive to the sun?

Posted by Susan Brown on August 29, 2017 0 Comments

This summer's must-reads aren't romances or thrillers; they're the warning labels and package inserts for your drugs and supplements. As Consumer Reports on Health warned in a recent article, “[s]ome widely used medications can make you far more sensitive to summer’s sunlight and heat than you’d usually be.”

That sensitivity can mean anything from a reduced ability to sweat to an increase in the amount of fluid you lose through your urine. So it’s important to revisit whatever safety info you have, and to check in with your doctor, who can let you know about potential risks during the brightest, warmest time of year.

Here are some of the better-known substances that may allow summer's sun and heat to hit you harder:

Antibiotics

 

“Antibiotics can cause photosensitivity and phototoxic reactions, meaning that they’re going to worsen your sunburn,” Rech says. “The one that comes to mind right away is Bactrim, or sulfamethoxozole trimethoprim.” Bactrim is prescribed to treat everything from bronchitis to bladder infections. “That’s a big offender, and so are tetracyclines and fluoroqinolones.” That said, you should never, ever skip an antibiotic for the sake of sunbathing, warns Rech. Your doctor can help you juggle your plans and your meds. 

Allergy medications

 

Some users find that oral antihistamines like diphenydramine (found in products like Benadryl and Dramamine) reduce their ability to sweat. In extreme cases, as the Consumer Reports medical advisory board noted, the overheating that can result leads to cramps, exhaustion, and even heat stroke. If you find that your allergy meds make it difficult for you to cool down, plan outdoor activities for the morning and evening, and try to spend the hottest hours of the day indoors.

Antidepressants

 

Tricyclic antidepressants may cause problems in hot weather because they "prevent the area in your brain that regulates heat response from knowing you’re overheating,” Rech explains. “They can also decrease sweating, which leads to a decrease in heat loss.”

When you’re taking a drug that increases the likelihood of overheating, stay alert for warning signssuch as headaches, lightheadedness, nausea, and weakness. If you experience any of those symptoms, get out of the sun and reach for water or a sports drink with sodium (which will help your body retain fluid until balance is restored). In the event of a severe reaction such as confusion, fever, or fainting, contact your doctor or call 911.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)

 

“The main non-steroidals that cause phototoxicity are probably not ones that we commonly use," Rech says. But still, caution should be used, especially if you're on other medications. "Any time you’re taking a non-steroidal and going out in the sun I would recommend barrier protection with sunscreen and avoidance if possible, because any of the non-steroidals can worsen [phototoxicity],” Rech explains.

Vitamins and herbs

 

“A lot of over-the-counter herbal medications [can have phototoxic effects]—for example, St. John’s Wort is a big inducer of photosensitivity, and that medication in particular has a number of drug interactions. Anyone [interested in taking it] should ask their doctor or pharmacist first,” says Rech. Another pill that might put you at risk: Niacin, a form of Vitamin B3 that’s used to treat high cholesterol. It can cause skin reactions, Rech says, "so it could potentially cause [sun sensitivity].”


Topical medications

 

Significant sun exposure can amplify the effect of transdermal patches (such as Fentanyl, a powerful pain reliever, or Clonidine, which lowers blood pressure) that deliver medication directly through the skin. When you get a sunburn, the blood vessels in the surface of your skin dilate, explains Rech, and that can lead to increased absorption of your meds. So if you’re wearing a patch, it's a good idea to consider long sleeves.

Source: http://www.health.com/family/heat-sun-sensitivity-medication

 

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Can summer heat make you SAD?

Posted by Susan Brown on June 27, 2016 0 Comments

Summer has just begun! Can it make you SAD? Seasonal Effective Disorder (SAD) is a type of mood disorder that affects a person during the same season each year. Those with summer SAD — also known as reverse seasonal affective disorder — tend to sleep less, eat less, lose weight, and may become extremely irritable and agitated. People can get very depressed in extreme heat and become trapped in their homes. It is difficult to engage in outdoor activities when it's so hot. Most will stay in their homes waiting for the sun to go down. But their energy level will still spike, making for extreme productivity at night. Also the heat just makes people irritable.

How to manage SAD...

Stay cool - Those with summer SAD should crank up the air conditioning and take cool showers. Sufferers can even freeze water bottles and place them at their feet come bedtime.

Keep Moving – Exercise is good for many reasons: physically, mentally and socially. Take a local exercise class offered indoors. Participating will get you out of the house and help you interact with others.

Get your sleep – Maintain a regular sleep schedule of approximately 7-8 hours by waking up and slumbering promptly at the same time each day.

Get out of Town – Plan a stress-free vacation. A weekend getaway where the temperatures are cooler and breezy.

Seek Treatment – If you notice a change in mood in the summer that disappears in the fall, it’s an initial sign you could have SAD. Visit a mental health professional to discuss proper treatments such as behavioral therapy, cognitive therapy, and practiced self management. In some situations, medication can also help.

 



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