Bathing Tips for Your New Baby

Posted by Susan Brown on March 19, 2018 0 Comments

Now that you are home from the hospital and starting your 4th Trimester...

You may have questions on how to bathe your little one. See our tips below:

How often to bathe your baby

In many families, a bath becomes the focus of a nightly bedtime routine. But from a cleanliness perspective, until your baby is crawling around and getting into messes, a bath isn't really necessary more than a few times a week. Just wash his face frequently, clean anywhere there are skin folds, and thoroughly clean his genital area after each diaper change.

Where to bathe your baby

It makes sense to use the kitchen sink or a small plastic baby tub. A standard bathtub requires you to kneel or lean awkwardly over your baby and gives you less control over his movements.

How to give your baby a bath

Here's how to do it and what you'll need to make baby-bathing easy. With any luck, bath time will become one of the most enjoyable parts of your days together:

1. Gather all necessary bath supplies, and lay out a towel, a clean diaper, and clothes. Make sure the room is comfortably warm so your baby doesn't get chilled.

2. Fill the tub with about 3 inches of water that feels warm but not hot to the inside of your wrist – about 90 degrees Fahrenheit (32 degrees Celsius) or a few degrees warmer.

3. Bring your baby to the bath area and undress her completely.

4. Gradually slip your baby into the tub feet first, using one hand to support her neck and head. Pour cupfuls of bath water over her regularly during the bath so she doesn't get cold.

5. Use mild soap sparingly (too much dries out your baby's skin). Wash her with your hand or a washcloth from top to bottom, front and back. Start by washing her scalp with a wet, soapy cloth. Rinse the soap from the cloth and use it to gently clean her eyes and face. If dried mucus has collected in the corner of your baby's nostrils or eyes, dab it several times with a small section of a moistened washcloth to soften it before you wipe it out. As for your baby's genitals, a routine washing is all that's needed.

6. Rinse your baby thoroughly with cupfuls of clean water, and wipe her with a clean washcloth.

7. Wrap your baby in a hooded towel and pat her dry. If her skin is dry, or if she has a bit of diaper rash, you may want to apply a mild lotion after her bath.

 

Source: Pregnancy Center

 

Read More

Taking Care of Yourself in the 4th Trimester and Makeup Hacks for New Moms

Posted by Susan Brown on February 12, 2018 0 Comments

Since new moms go through so many different life changes after having a baby, it can be challenging to keep up with appearances—especially in terms of makeup. For new moms, putting on makeup every day when your little one is crying for breakfast or needing to be changed can easily become the last resort on your to-do list. But still, there are many simple hair care and other hygiene tips for new moms that can make personal care routines seem like less of a strain.

By taking just five minutes, new moms can develop a quick makeup routine that can be done without much effort each day. Wearing healthy, natural makeup can help you feel polished, refreshed and ready to take on the day. Implementing these simple makeup hacks to your daily routine will make you feel youthful and put-together; after all, moms deserve to be pampered, too. 

Make Your Skin Glow

Most new moms have probably experienced changes in their skin after having a baby. People always talk about the pregnancy glow, but what about the new-mom glow? Fortunately, by prepping your skin and taking care of it properly, both in the morning and at night, new moms can make their skin glow and look refreshed.

First, use a foundation to even out skin  as it will disguise any spots or blemishes. Using the foundation with a light moisturizer is important to keep the skin looking young and to make sure your overall complexion doesn’t suffer dryness throughout the day. Plus, it will help your skin glow and have an overall fresh look, even if you are tired from taking care of the baby.

Perk Up Your Tired Eyes

If you haven’t gotten much sleep lately, you may not know what types of makeup to use to perk up your tired eyes. However, using moisturizing eye drops in the morning will instantly brighten up your eyes—and it may even help to wake you up! By then adding a little under-eye concealer, you can reduce dark circles underneath the eyes.

It also helps to get your eyebrows shaped or waxed, as this will better define your eyes and make your face generally look more polished. If you have the time, you can sweep a brown powder along your upper lash line to further enhance the definition but still looks soft. And as always, a little mascara goes a long way in diminishing over-tiredness.

If you are a new mom looking for some makeup tips, try moisturizing or using foundation to make your skin glow and focus on brightening up your eyes as part of the easiest five-minute morning routine.

Check out our friends at 4thtrimesteraz.org who are hosting a 4th Trimester Conference on March 10th, 2018 in Mesa, AZ. See more info below.

The 4th Trimester Arizona connects a village of new families by providing resources, support and nurturing through conferences and community events.

The vulnerability of women and families during the postpartum period is often overlooked in the U.S. Women may feel pressure to clean, make dinner, lose baby weight, and possibly to return to work, all while healing from birth and learning how to care for a newborn’s every need, often in isolation. Many face sleepless nights, pain, hormonal changes, physical exhaustion, money concerns, and more. Because social mores dictate that women feel only joy and fulfillment during this time, many mothers feel shame and guilt at their own disappointment and feelings of overwhelm. Fathers, partners and other family members often feel helpless as well, as they may need to return to work full time, may themselves be sleep deprived, and may be without resources or tools to offer the mother.

 

Read More

Considerations of Renting Property As New Parents 

Posted by Susan Brown on January 18, 2018 0 Comments

 

Everything is slightly harder after baby arrives, from sleeping, to eating, to baby proofing a home that might not be yours. The first year of a baby’s life moves fast, with baby going from staying still to becoming quite mobile. Additionally, as baby ages, he or she will eventually need personal sleeping space away from Mom and Dad. Renting a home and trying to cater to baby’s growing needs are often a challenge, unless the stages are considered one at a time.

0-3 Months

Renting at this age is the easiest in regards to the baby, but the toughest in regards to the lease. This is the time when the parents are the most tired, and things around the home are left undone. However, sleepy parents who ignore household maintenance may be breaking lease rules. For example, if the yard maintenance must be done by the tenants, the landlord might get upset when the lawn is left unmowed for three months. Everything, from paying rent on time to cleaning the kitchen counters might take a break when baby is brand new. Communicating with the landlord is the first line of defense against offending the lease. While many landlords purchase insurance against missed rent payments, missing payments will still affect your credit score. Avoid a situation by talking to the landlord. Inform him or her that a baby is coming, and discuss the possibility of flexible lease terms. There may be a paid service for lawn care, or a clause that covers hardship situations.

3-6 Months

Baby won’t be moving extensively yet, but scooting will begin during this baby stage of development. Some babies might even crawl at this point. Again, reviewing the lease to find out about wall hangings is important at this stage. Many baby items, such as baby gates, attach to walls. Many rentals, however, do not allow any holes larger than a nail hole in the walls. This means that a different baby gate will need to be used, such as a gate that depends on pressure against a wall to remain in place. Additionally, wall mounts to hold televisions will need to be kept out of the walls, and drawer locks that drill into the cabinets will not work out. Luckily, there are a variety of different baby safety options, such as television anchors that attach to the entertainment center instead of the wall. Look for safety options that do not cause damage to walls, ceilings, cabinets or floors.

6-9 Months

This is the age when little ones figure out how to become fully mobile. While they are not yet walking, they are crawling, possibly pulling themselves up, or even taking a few wobbly steps. Living in a rental during this time means making sure the corners are secure with removable corner covers. These soft covers will come off when the rental property is returned to the owner, but will help keep baby safe. Talk to the landlord about any cracks in the floors that could be fixed to help keep baby safe as he or she explores. Choose a high chair that does not attach to the counters to avoid causing damage, and keep a wet/dry mop handy to clean up after baby, who is now eating some solids and making dinner messes on the floor.

9-12 Months

This is definitely go time! The baby is possibly walking fully, exploring everything, and making messes everywhere. Disinfecting wipes are a parent’s best friend, as they will help keep areas clean. Many leases include a cleanliness clause, as cleanliness helps maintain the property. The wet/dry mop will also come in handy, as will a mobile crib where baby can play while Mom or Dad clean up a room. Make sure to double check safety locks, and replace any that have been damaged. When replacing safety equipment, look over the cabinet or wall where it is attached. Make sure the equipment is not damaging the rental property.

Sleeping Arrangements

The baby may stay with Mom and Dad in a crib at first, but will eventually need to move to another bedroom. When renting a home, it’s important to review the lease agreement. According to the Fair Housing Act, landlords cannot tell parents where the baby sleeps, or with whom the baby shares a room. However, some leases state that the parents must report the additional person in the home. This clause is often included to keep people from moving in too many adults. It is legal for the landlord to know who is living in the home, but it is not legal for him or her to dictate sleeping arrangements. 

In the end, when parents are open with landlords, the latter tend to work with tenants. Tenants who pay rent consistently and abide by lease guidelines typically have few issues with landlords when baby arrives. Using open, honest communication, following the rules as much as possible, and working out a plan ahead of time is the best way to rent a home with an infant.

 

*Photo by Picsea on Unsplash

 

Read More

Battling Bed Bugs for Your Baby

Posted by Kayla Tryon on November 09, 2017 0 Comments

Battling Bed Bugs for Your Baby

 

            “Sleep tight; don’t let the bed bugs bite.” A phrase commonly expressed to children at bedtime with little to no thought behind its traditional meaning, until recently. Bed bugs, those tiny, nasty, creepy-crawlies with a full course dinner menu comprised of warm blood. That’s right, you’re actually on a dinner menu, but you’re not alone. Your little ones are also in jeopardy. So what exactly are bed bugs and why does it feel like they came out of nowhere with a vengeance? Are they life-threatening? How can you treat yourself after contact and how are you even supposed to get rid of them? The questions are endless, but take a deep breath; relax, and let’s look a little into what these creatures are and how you can protect yourself and your loved ones.

Brief History

            For almost 40 years, bed bugs had almost disappeared completely. In the early 20th century bed bugs were exceedingly common until the introduction of highly potent insecticides. Bed bugs were such a huge problem that people routinely checked for them and actually resorted to constantly carrying around these potent insecticides wherever they traveled. From the mid-1950’s to the late 1990’s bed bugs vanished to the point where people could no longer identify them. A new generation of pest control professionals wasn’t quite equipped to fight them off. The potent insecticide once used so frequently and effectively enough to almost wipe them out, was banned worldwide in 2001. Thus the prevalence of bed bugs ensued.

What Are Bed Bugs?

            Cimex lectularius, also known as bed bugs, are blood-feeding parasites that prefer and thrive in warm, dry places. Their typical meal is usually humans, but any warm-blooded mammal will do. The good news is that bed bugs do not pose a threat on your life. They are distressing, yes, but NOT dangerous. Their bites are usually painless and do not spread any blood-borne diseases. However, you must be attentive of your children and animals for they are more prone to vigorously scratching at the bites and this, in turn, may cause skin infections. Approximately 1/3rd of people bitten do not even notice the bites. This can easily cause further infestation. The people that do experience reactions develop what looks like raised welts and can cause serious allergic reactions in some people. Resolution usually takes two weeks and can leave behind post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, or darker spots on the skin.

            Bed bugs have five stages of development which typically take 40 days when well fed, however, this process may be extended if food source is limited. The egg, which looks like a grain of rice, begins the process of their life cycle. The first stage nymph measures 1.5 mm and is usually difficult to see until their first feeding. The second stage nymph measures 2 mm. The third stage nymph measures 2.5 mm, the fourth stage nymph measures 3mm, and the fifth stage nymph measures 4.5 mm. Adult bed bugs are about the size of apple seeds. Females lay between one and five eggs each day and can lay up to 500 eggs in its lifetime. The eggs usually hatch within two weeks. Newly hatched nymphs can survive weeks without feeding. Adult bed bugs can live four-six months, although some may live up to a year without feeding under cool conditions. They have an oblong shell and a tiny head. If not fed recently, they are long and brown with a flat and oval shaped body. If fed recently, they swell up like a balloon, appear reddish-brown, and have a more elongated body. They are considered a “true bug” due to their beak with three segments, an antenna with four parts, wings that are not used for flying, and short, golden-colored hairs. They are skittish and don’t like movement but they can also crawl pretty fast when they need to. They usually come out at dawn to feed but can adapt to your very own sleeping schedule. The way they feed is by latching on to its host for a few minutes and then scurrying back their hiding places to digest. More time is spent digesting than actual feeding, nevertheless, since they tend to infest so rapidly, it may feel like you’re getting new bites every morning.

Rising Number of Bed Bugs in the U.S. and Recent Reports of Findings

            Arizona, the home state of the company, Susan Brown’s Baby, has just recently experienced public outbreaks of bed bugs. The first being at AMC Westgate 20 after a photo went viral claiming that bed bugs were in the theatre and clearly displaying infestations in the cracks and crevices of the theatre’s seats. Another person afterwards confirmed this. The auditorium was cleared and reopened after being treated by a pest control company.

            The most recent public sighting of bed bugs occurred at Phoenix Sky Harbor in Terminal 4. There, near the food courts, bed bugs were spotted on a padded bench. The benches were removed and a pest control company was called. They agreed to follow up to confirm that the areas at Sky Harbor were clear.

            Nonetheless, a long-time employee whose name was not disclosed reports that the bed bug problem has been an ongoing issue for a long while now. He also claimed seeing and moving multiple pieces of furniture so infested you could see the bugs moving on it. In fact, he’s helped move so much furniture that people are noticing and concluding that it must be due to a bed bug issue. He doesn’t think they have what it takes to dispose of the bed bugs completely. Not a fun thought for those of you who travel so often, so beware.

How They Spread and Signs of Bed Bugs in Your Home

            Bed bugs are considered hitchhikers. Anywhere you travel they can simply crawl onto your clothes, and your personal belongings. You do not need to have a dirty home to contract bed bugs since their sole meal is blood and not filth.

            They love to hide in seams, headboards, bed frames, dressers, behind wallpaper, mattresses, cracks and crevices, and anywhere they can fit their small bodies so make sure to check these areas thoroughly. Also check before bringing home second-hand furniture.

            Signs of infestation include: fecal spots, shed skin, egg shells, blood stains and dark spots on sheets and pillowcases, and an offensive, musty odor from their scent glands. Also, the new bites you wake up with in the morning are a pretty significant sign.

            If you think you have come in contact with bed bugs make sure you put your clothes directly in the washer, followed by the dryer for at least 30 minutes. This part is very important as bed bugs cannot stand high heat. Make sure to vacuum often, buy a light colored mattress protector and springs to easily spot bed bugs, and install door sweeps to keep them from traveling into other rooms.

 

Tune in for next week’s blog for extermination and treatment of bed bugs! Also, don’t miss out on your opportunity for an exclusive 20% off discount code for Susan Brown’s Baby Botanical Gelèe!

Read More

Recent Blog Posts