Keeping You and Your Child Safe: Medication And Your Pregnancy

Posted by Susan Brown on March 04, 2019 0 Comments

 

Keeping You and Your Child Safe: Medication And Your Pregnancy

 

Around 90% of pregnant women make use of at least one form of medicine during the course of their pregnancy according to the findings of the CDC. As the health of the mother and the child hangs in the balance when it comes to side effects of medicine, it’s important to know what to avoid before and after the pregnancy. So exactly what sort of medication should be given a wide berth? 

 

 

During Pregnancy

 

 

Drugs and substances deemed too dangerous for pregnant women are called teratogenic. Whatever medication you take, whether safe or teratogenic, will affect the life growing inside you. In some cases, the effect of medicine like Isotretinoin (used to fight acne) can be damaging. Known effects are birth defects, low birth weight, and even increase the likelihood of premature birth as established by J. Parboosingh. If you take substances like opioids, there is a huge chance that your child will be at risk for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS).

 

 

The pregnant body often has a compromised immune system. The health of the child needs to be considered before you take any medicine. This is particularly true when it comes to taking antibiotics. There are certain kinds that are thought to be dangerous for pregnant women like Bactrim, Macrobid, and Doxycycline. There are other substances that can put your health risk so you need to be suitably informed.

 

 

After Birth

 

 

Once the child is born, this does not mean that you will be completely free to take medication and substances without due consideration. Take for example regular medication for colds. Breastfed babies get roughly 10% of the dose of cold medication that their mother takes as found by Dr. Elisa Ross of Cleveland Clinic. Substances like Domperidone (used to fight nausea) can put infants at risk for cardiac arrhythmias. Medicine like Metamizole or Dipyrone (a painkiller) can increase risk of pharmacological effects in children. It is generally for the best to avoid taking any antipsychotics while breastfeeding. If you take medication to treat schizophrenia, the child may be at risk for speech delays.

 

 

Things To Remember

 

 

Before taking any sort of medication, it is always good to consult your OB-GYN and your child’s pediatrician to be guided accordingly. The effect of medication can depend entirely on factors like your health and your child’s age, weight, and medical history. If you have any preexisting medical conditions, you aren’t doing anyone any favors by staying away from your medicine. It is fully possible to take necessary medication and reap the benefits. For example, the likes of mild painkillers, antihistamine, antacids, and certain antimicrobial medication can help. They can boost your health so you can better care for yourself and your child.

 

 

At the end of the day, the act of assumption will do the most damage to your health. Your pregnancy and subsequent birth are both exciting times and you need to be in your peak physical health. Medication isn’t the enemy and being fully aware of the things you need to avoid can give you and your child a better chance of staying healthy.

 

 

 

 

Previous Post Next Post

Comments (0 Comments)

There are no comments.

Post Comment




Recent Blog Posts

Blog Tags